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Conflict Free Diamonds

CONFLICT FREE DIAMONDS

Conflict Free Diamonds - siebkehoyt.com

We CARE

Siebke Hoyt was established in 1889 with a commitment to you and fine jewelry. Each year we contribute over $100,000 to non-profit ventures in and around the communities that we do business because we care about people and the communities in which we live and work. We also care deeply about the merchandise we carry and the reputable practices of the industry in which we do business.

WHAT IS A CONFLICT DIAMOND?

Conflict diamonds are un-cut or rough diamonds that have been used by rebel movements or their allies to finance "conflict" aimed at undermining legitimate governments. The proportion of conflict diamond has always been very small and has been shrinking dramatically in recent years because of a variety of factors including cease-fires in the Sierra Leone and Angola regions, as well as reforms and new practices adopted by the diamond industry.

Customers can be confident that comprehensive measures have been taken to assure that the diamonds that we sell are "conflict" free. Since 2000, Siebke Hoyt has required vendors to sign an agreement pledging that they will not knowingly buy or sell "conflict" diamonds. Beginning in 2003, we took that requirement a step farther as supporters of the Kimberley Process and the System of Warranties, an industry program of self-regulation.

THE KIMBERLEY PROCESS

Today, 80 governments have adopted a system to control the export and import of rough diamonds mined from 2003 onward. Known as the Kimberley Process, it requires that each shipment of rough diamonds - before cutting and polishing - be placed in a tamper-resistant container and accompanied by a government-validated certificate. Each certificate is uniquely numbered and contains data describing the shipment's contents.

Participating countries have pledged to impound shipments of rough diamonds from any nation that fails to subscribe to the standard. Shipments lacking proper certification will be treated in a similar way. The U.S. Customs is responsible for enforcement at American ports of entry.